Top 5 Publishing Articles/Blog Posts of the Week 11/3-11/7

number_5_redEvery week, we recommend 5 publishing articles/blog posts that supplement the major news for the week. Whether data or industry commentary, we hope these 5 links will be a simple way to keep you in the know.

What does Scribd’s audiobook launch mean for Audible?

Is the international rights market expanding for children’s books?

Should ebooks become more social?

How is digital watermarking technology different from Adobe DRM in the ebook anti-piracy fight?

What trends are libraries seeing in ebook lending in 2014?

People Round-Up, Early November 2014

PEOPLE

Claudia Reuter was named the head of the HMH Labs, a new digital initiative at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Previously, she was CEO of SchoolChapters.

Jason Prince is now Marketing Operations Manager at St. Martin’s Press.  Previously, he was VP, Publisher and VP of Sales & Marketing at Sterling Publishing.

In the UK, Sally Dwyer joined Quarto Group in the newly created position of Group Director of People.  She will be responsible for Quarto’s human resources strategy across its international businesses. She was previously Managing Director at MLC Consulting.

George Bick joined Regan Arts as Sales Director.  In the past, he was SVP, Sales at HarperCollins and William Morrow.

Lauren Zalaznick joined the Penguin Random House Board of Directors. She currently publishes a newsletter titled The LZ Sunday Paper.

Additionally at Penguin, Megan Sullivan is now Sales Representative for New England.  Previously, she was Publicity Manager at David R. GodineCaitlin O’Shaughnessy will move from Associate Editor at Viking to Marketing Manager at Penguin Press. Additionally, Tara Singh Carlson joined Putnam as Senior Editor.  She will continue to acquire trade paperback originals for Penguin while acquiring hardcover titles for Putnam.

Angelin Borsics rejoined Clarkson Potter as Editor.  She worked there from 2005-2013 and then joined West Elm as Copywriter.

Alyson Forbes joined Hachette Book Group as Ad Director after leaving her position as Deputy Director of Creative Services at Random House.  Additionally, Nancy Chen has joined as Marketing Strategy Associate.  Previously, she was Senior SEO and Social Specialist at Path Interactive.

In children’s publishing, Nellie Kurtzman is now Director, Integrated Marketing at HarperCollins Children’s Books. Previously, she was VP, Marketing for Little, Brown Books for Young Readers.  Additionally, Cheryl Rozier joined HarperCollins Children’s Books as Director of Integrated Marketing, Advertising and Promotion.  Previously, she was at Hachette Book Group as Advertising Director for the adult and children’s divisions . . . Christine Labov joined Random House Children’s Books as Agent Director, Random House Speakers Bureau . . . Jodie Hockensmith joined Simon & Schuster Children’s as Associate Director of Publicity.  Most recently, she was Associate Publicity Manager at Random House Children’s Books.  Additionally, Alex Maurer joined S&S as Manager, Children’s Custom & Proprietary Sales. Previously, she was Senior Coordinator, Custom & Proprietary Sales at Penguin Group . . . Natasha Gilmore joined Publishers Weekly as Associate Children’s Book Editor.  Previously, she was Bookseller and Assistant Buyer at Brookline Booksmith . . . Paige Hazzan joined Scholastic as an Associate Editor after working as an Associate Editor at HarperCollins. . . Patricia Ocampo will be Interim Managing Editor of Annick Press as of November 10th.  Previously, she was Agent at Transatlantic Agency . . . Rob Wall joined Little Bee Books as Senior Designer.  Formerly, he was Designer at Blue Apple Books . . . Nathalie Le Du is now Senior Editor, Children’s Group at Workman Publishing.   She was previously Editor at Kumon Workbooks . . . Stefanie Hoffman joined Little, Brown Children’s as Marketing Manager. Previously, she was Marketing Associate at Harper Children’s.

In religious publishing, Doug Lockhart joined HarperCollins Christian Publishing as Senior VP, Bible Marketing and Outreach. Formerly, he was CEO at Biblica . . . Linda Bruner joined Upper Room Books as Multimedia Marketing Manager . . . Previously, she was the Events Sales Manager at United Methodist Publishing House . . . Brian Thomasson joined Baker Publishing Group as Senior Acquisitions Editor.  Formerly, he was Senior Editor at NavPress . . . Dan Rich announced his retirement as Chief Publishing Officer of David C. Cook in May 2015.  Meanwhile, Tim Close joined the company as Senior Director of Marketing, Trade.  Formerly, he was President of CrowdScribed, LLC.

At literary agencies, Linda Scalissi joined 3 Seas Literary Agency as Agent . . . Rich Green joined the media rights department of ICM.  Previously, he was at CAA.

Juliana Horbachevsky joined Abrams as Publicist. She was formerly Associate Publicist at Gallery Books.

Morgan Doremus is now Publicity and Marketing Manager for Sourcebooks Casablanca. Previously, she was Marketing Manager at Hachette’s Forever imprint.

Christine Kopprasch has joined Flatiron Books as Senior Editor.  Previously, she was Editor at Crown Publishing Group.

Lauren Castner is now Associate Sales Manager, Special Sales at Ryland, Peters & Small and CICO Books.  Previously, she was Gift Sales Associate at Workman Publishing.

Morgan Elwell joined Kensington as Communications & Marketing Manager, Mystery and Thrillers.  Formerly, she produced Virginia This Morning, a TV program affiliated with CBS.  Additionally, Mala Bhattacharjee has joined Kensington as Communications & Marketing Manager, Dafina and Women’s Fiction.  She was previously Features Editor at RT Book Reviews.

Peg O’Donnell joined Lonely Planet as Senior Director of Marketing.  Previously, she was Account Manager at Publishers Group West.

In university publishing, Dennis Langlois joined Princeton University Press as Chief Information Officer.  Previously, he was Chief Information Officer at The Savitz Organization . . . Jeremy Grainger joined Rutgers University Press as Sales and Marketing Director. Previously, he was Sales and Marketing Manager for the photography publisher Aperture Foundation . . . Derek Krissoff joined University of West Virginia Press as Director.  Previously, he was Editor-in-Chief at University of Nebraska Press . . . Eric Schwartz joined Columbia University Press as Editorial Director after leaving his job as Senior Editor of Sociology and Cognitive Sciences at Princeton University Press . . . John Loudon joined Yale University Press as Consulting Editor-At-Large.  Previously, he was Executive Editor at HarperOne.

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Top 5 Publishing Articles/Blog Posts of the Week 10/27-10/31

number_5_redEvery week, we recommend 5 publishing articles/blog posts that supplement the major news for the week. Whether data or industry commentary, we hope these 5 links will be a simple way to keep you in the know.

Is the end of Atavist Books also the end of interactive fiction?

What does the Georgia State University decision reversal mean for interpretations of fair use?

Can hashtags help publishers increase their social media audience?

Is the perfect publishing industry happening right now?

Why has fan fiction become popular in publishing?

International Bestsellers, October 2014

Every month, Publishing Trends runs fiction international bestsellers lists from four territories–France, Germany, Italy, and Spain. This month, our four regular territories are joined by two more: Norway and China.  Those books that have been published in English are listed with their official English-language title. All others are translated as literally as possible from the original. Where applicable, the US publisher is listed after the local publisher, separated by a “/”. The lists are taken from major newspapers or national retailers, which are noted at the bottom of each list.  BestsellerSept2014.FranceBestsellerOctober2014.Germany

BestsellerOctober.2014 Spain

BestsellerOctober2014 ItalyBestsellerOctNorway2014BestsellerOct2014.China

 

Adventures in Grown Up Reads for Young Adults

When someone says “YA” the assumption is he or she is referring to YA fiction. It might be time to retire that assumption. There’s a new(ish) YA in town: young adult nonfiction adaptations. This is a genre of young adult books adapted from books written for an adult audience. We’re certainly not the first to notice this phenomenon, The New York Times, The Awl, and Stacked Books have all covered it. But the question remains, why is this happening? And further, is it necessary?

Repackaging existing book material for the younger set isn’t a new idea. Young readers’ editions of various books have existed for some time. Very often, biographies and memoirs of inspirational athletes, celebrities, or historical figureheads are adapted for the younger set, including but not limited to I am Malala by new Nobel Prize Winner Malala Yousafzai which was republished as a YA edition this August. One imagines that retooling material for children is a somewhat easy line to walk, insofar as it’s simpler to know what’s inappropriate for a 9 year old as opposed to a 39 year old. The line between adult and young adult is presumably more difficult.

Therein lies the potential issue with these adaptations. All of them deal with fascinating material, but sometimes the quest to make these histories “appropriate” for a younger age removes their poignancy. Several of the books that have received the YA nonfiction treatment have some deeply unpleasant material in the adult version, from torture in Unbroken by Laura Hillebrand to the fast food atrocities in Fast Food Nation by Eric Schlosser.

Unbroken is keeping the same title for the YA version, which will publish November 11th, but it won’t have all of the same grisly details as its adult counterpart. The New York Times interviewed Hillebrand about the YA publication of her book and Hillebrand said she wanted to leave out scenes that she thought would “upset” non-adult readers.

Fast Food Nation was repackaged for a younger audience and retitled as Chew on This when it published in 2007. Matt Buchanan from The Awl read Chew on This and describes it as “stripped of all its horror.” There seems to be an underlying struggle to get the spirit of the original right in the YA version. Read More »

Top 5 Publishing Articles/Blog Posts of the Week 10/20-10/24

number_5_redEvery week, we recommend 5 publishing articles/blog posts that supplement the major news for the week. Whether data or industry commentary, we hope these 5 links will be a simple way to keep you in the know.

What do changing preferences in reading print or digital mean for the industry?

Is discoverability still a problem when it comes to direct to consumer book sales?

What does Atavist’s closing mean for other short form publishers?

How can books help children deal with bereavement?

What does Richard Flanagan’s Man Booker Prize mean for the Australian literary scene?

Top 5 Publishing Articles/Blog Posts of the Week 10/13-10/17

number_5_redEvery week, we recommend 5 publishing articles/blog posts that supplement the major news for the week. Whether data or industry commentary, we hope these 5 links will be a simple way to keep you in the know.

Can a large YouTube following translate to book publishing success?

Does the Man Booker Prize have a problem of repeating authors when compiling its lists?

Author William O’Neil examines the traditional publisher advance in the age of Amazon and digital publishing.

Will Amazon’s new crowdsourcing program Kindle Scout pose a threat to agents’ jobs?

Book ban rumors in China help boost authors by increasing readers’ intrigue.

Editors’ note: Our People Round-Up, Mid-October 2014 was updated to acknowledge recent structure changes at Perseus Book Group.

People Round-Up, Mid-October 2014

PEOPLE

The following update about Perseus Book Group was added to the original post on 10/17/14.

Perseus Book Group announced a number of changes in order to unify its publishing imprints and distribution. Susan Weinberg is promoted to Senior VP, Group Publisher and all imprint heads will report to her. Sabrina McCarthy moves from her position as President of Perseus Distribution to become Senior VP, Group Sales with Heidi Sachner moving up to replace her while Matty Goldberg takes on a new position as President of Publishing, Client and Sales Development.  Mark Suchomel is promoted to a new position of President, Client Services with all four heads of the distribution companies reporting in, while Jeff Tagge moves up at Legato to replace him. Joining Perseus from General Electric is Raymond Floyd in the new position of Senior VP for Operations.

As a result of these changes, Chris Navratil, Publisher of Running Press, is leaving the company as are Patrick Kirk and Scott Edinburgh, who were in project management and business development respectively. Allison Devlin, currently Associate Publisher and Marketing Director, has been named Acting Publisher of Running Press while a search is conducted.

Mary Rasenberger was named the new Executive Director of the Authors Guild. She is a Partner at media law firm Cowan, DeBaets, Abrahams and Sheppard.  Her predecessor Paul Aiken will continue to act as a consultant for the Guild.

Liza Baker returned to Scholastic as VP and Executive Editorial Director of Cartwheel and Orchard Books, leaving her previous position as Editor-in-Chief at Little, Brown Books for Young ReadersMeanwhile, Abigail Stahlman joined Scholastic as Graphic Designer of the Trade Marketing Group after freelancing for the company.

Jonathan Jao joined the Harper imprint last month as VP, Executive Editor. Previously, he was Senior Editor at Random HouseKendra Harpster has also left her position as Senior Editor at Random House to join Berkley Books as Executive Editor.

Janet Goldstein left her position as SVP, Editorial Director of National Geographic Books in DC and is now pursuing other opportunities. She can be reached at her publishing strategy firm, www.janetgoldstein.com, or her email, [email protected].

Michele Jacob left her position as VP, Director of Publicity at Basic Books at Perseus Book Group to join the Manhattan Institute, a nonprofit that supports and publishes research on public policy. She can be reached at [email protected].

In children’s:  Sarah Dotts Barley joined Flatiron Books at Macmillan as Senior Editor.  Previously, she was Editor at HarperCollins Children’s Books. . . .Faye Bi joined Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing as Publicist after leaving her position as Publicist at Little, Brown Books for Young Readers. . . .Anne Hetzel joined the teen imprint Amulet Books at Abrams as Editor. Previously, she was Associate Editor at Razorbill. In August, Cecily Kaiser left her position as Publishing Directorat the Appleseed imprint of Abrams to join Phaidon as Publishing Director, Children’s Books.

Bobbilyn Jones joined Grand Central Life & Style as Publicity Manager.  Previously, she was Senior Publicist at Atria.

Tim Wudurski joined Chronicle Books as Manager of Production and Creative Systems.  His previous experiences were in production and IT at California Home+Design, 7×7, and Spin.

John Maas and Sarah Passick joined Sterling Lord Literistic as Associate Agents. Maas was an Assistant Editor at Wiley and Passick was an agent at Stonesong.

Valerie Cortes is now Publisher of Boston Review. Previously, she was Circulation and Marketing Director Bookforum and Artforum.

Deborah Kaufmann joined Legendary Entertainment as VP, Literary Affairs.  She was Senior Editor at Calmann-Levy and head of fantasy and science fiction publisher Orbit France.

Tom Scotty is now Chief Operating Officer at digital textbook distributor RedShelf. Previously, he was Co-President at Macmillan Higher Education.

Jennifer Hergenroeder joined The Experiment as Marketing and Publicity Manager.  She previously was the Senior Publicist at The University of North Carolina Press.

Dr. Michelle Anthony has joined the nonprofit Christian publisher David C. Cook as VP and Publisher of the Learning Resources Group.

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Libraries and Licensing

With the ever-increasing importance of libraries as a way readers can discover new authors and books, and the growing popularity of digital access, we thought it was time to post a comprehensive update on libraries and ebook licensing.

It’s important to recognize that the large majority of libraries license, rather than buy, their ebooks.  This is a critical difference, because in licensing contracts, the first sale doctrine does not apply.

For those who need reminding, the first sale doctrine is the section of copyright law that states “once a product is sold, the original creator/owner gives up all rights to preventing that copy from being resold, lent, rented, or otherwise conveyed to another person,” according to John Palfrey at The Digital Shift.

When the issue of ebook collections came up, publishers opted to license ebooks instead of selling, not only because libraries are a distinct  market, but because they wanted to maintain the one patron, one book per rental paradigm with an expiration date imitating print’s inevitable wear and tear.  This decision came after a fairly long period of time when publishers grappled with the best way to mimic their print deals with libraries, resulting in the initially controversial HarperCollins model.

As currently set up, the Big 5 have a few ways of going about ebook licensing contracts:

Licensing Chart FINAL

Data from The Digital Shift, 8/2014

 

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The Top 5 Publishing Articles/Blog Posts of the Week 10/6-10/10

number_5_redEvery week, we recommend 5 publishing articles/blog posts that supplement the major news for the week. Whether data or industry commentary, we hope these 5 links will be a simple way to keep you in the know.

Nielsen data from the first half of 2014 shows that physical book purchases far outweigh ebook purchases.

On that note, The Economist extrapolated current ebook data to forecast when ebooks will become more popular than print books.

A Bowker study released this week shows that self-publishing continues to steadily rise in the United States.

Should foreign language publishers start publishing their books in English too?

The New York Times calls for more neutral parties to explore the Amazon/Hachette negotiations.